The following sets of pages are dedicated to a series of books written by Frank Herbert. These books are Dune, Dune Messiah, Children of Dune, God Emperor of Dune, Heretics of Dune, and Chapterhouse: Dune. In 1984, Director David Lynch directed a big budget film adaptation of these novels. Though that film was a box office bomb, it too has a wide cult following. The film information provided here also covers the span of several years spent trying to produce the film. This includes works of Alexandro Jodorowsky and H.R. Giger. Several games have been created in recognition of Dune's popularity, including the popular Dune II by Westwood (recently updated as Dune 2000).

Quote of the Day (Children of Dune):

       Above all else, the mentat must be a generalist, not a specialist. It is wise to have decisions of great moment monitored by generalists. Experts and specialists lead you quickly into chaos. They are a source of useless nit-picking, the ferocious quibble over a comma. The mentat-generalist, on the other hand, should bring to decision-making a healthy common sense. He must not cut himself off from the broad sweep of what is happening in his universe. He must remain capable of saying: "There's no real mystery about this at the moment. This is what we want now. It may prove wrong later, but we'll correct that when we come to it." The mentat-generalist must understand that anything which we can identify as our universe is merely a part of larger phenomena. But the expert looks backward; he looks into the narrow standards of his own specialty. The generalist looks outward; he looks for living principles, knowing full well that such principles change, that they develop. It is to the characteristics of change itself that the mentat-generalist must look. There can be no permanent catalogue of such change, no handbook or manual. You must look at it with as few preconceptions as possible, asking yourself: "Now what is this thing doing?"

--The Mentat Handbook